Sensors, Vision

Courtesy: Pleora/AIA
Sensors, Vision November 23, 2020

Top 5 Control Engineering Articles Nov. 16-22, 2020

Articles about SCADA, HMI and MES projects, deep learning enabling machine vision solutions, maintenance automation, IIoT, and more were Control Engineering’s five most clicked articles from Nov. 16-22, 2020. Miss something? You can catch up here.

By Keagan Gay
Cornell researchers in the Organic Robotics Lab designed a 3D-printed glove lined with stretchable fiber-optic sensors that use light to detect a range of deformations in real time. Courtesy: Cornell University
Sensors, Vision November 18, 2020

Stretchable sensor gives robots and VR a human touch

A fiber-optic sensor that combines low-cost LEDs and dyes has been created by Cornell researchers, which results in a stretchable “skin” that detects deformations such as pressure, bending and strain.

By David Nutt
Courtesy: Pleora/AIA
Sensors, Vision November 12, 2020

How deep learning enables machine vision solutions

Deep learning offers machine vision designers a powerful new tool for advanced inspection and it's getting easier to apply thanks to technology advances.

By Winn Hardin
Courtesy: i-5O
Sensors, Vision October 29, 2020

Digital twin start-up offers guidance to manufacturers

Albert Kao, CEO and co-founder of the company, offered some background about his company, i-5O, and their work with digital twins powered by computer vision systems.

By CFE Media
Iowa State's Jonathan Claussen is studying how plant-based inks can be used to print low-cost, biodegradable and recyclable sensors that can, for example, detect nitrate and ammonium. Larger illustration. Courtesy: Jonathan Claussen, Iowa State University
Energy, Power October 20, 2020

Manufacturing biobased electronics for sensors, batteries

Researchers are studying how plant-based inks can be used to print low-cost, biodegradable and recyclable sensors.

By Mike Krapfl
Courtesy: Yokogawa
IIoT, Industrie 4.0 October 19, 2020

Top 5 Control Engineering articles Oct. 12-18

Articles about using human and artificial intelligence with digital twins, 2021 Engineers' Choice Finalists, automated anomaly detection maximizing production, and more were Control Engineering’s five most clicked articles from Oct. 12-18, 2020. Miss something? You can catch up here.

By Keagan Gay
Courtesy: Posital Fraba
Sensors, Vision October 16, 2020

How hollow-shaft encoders break the multi-turn barrier

Adding multi-turn measurement capabilities to hollow-shaft encoders used to be challenging, but adding a Wiegand wire system makes it easier and expands usable applications, including robotics.

By Christian Fell
With a novel layer to help the metallic components of the sensor bond, an international team of researchers printed sensors directly on human skin. Courtesy: Penn State University
Sensors, Vision October 15, 2020

Engineers print wearable sensors directly on skin without heat

An international team of researchers have developed a method of printing sensors directly on human skin without the use of heat.

By Ashley J. WennersHerron
WVU engineers are developing second generation methane watchdog system to improve the safety methane sensors in longwall mines. Courtesy: West Virginia University
Sensors, Vision October 9, 2020

Monitoring network, sensors developed to improve longwall mine safety

Researchers are working on a methane monitoring network to increase the safety of longwall mines, which could help other industries where hazardous gases are a major factor.

By Paige Nesbit
Food packaging processes can include accurate label inspection, although this label here isn’t the application described. Courtesy: Mark T. Hoske, Control Engineering, CFE Media and Technology
System Integration October 1, 2020

Automation helps packaging verification

Machine vision and code readers verify packing label quality. As with many machine vision applications proper set-up and fixturing are needed in this packaging automation system integration project.

By Don McLeod