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Sensors, Actuators

Courtesy: Endress+Hauser
IIoT, Industrie 4.0 April 2, 2020

Deploy IIoT sensors and networks in remote locations

IIoT adds value within a plant, but also is a natural fit for field data gathering

By Ryan Williams
Courtesy: Hydro-chem
Sensors, Actuators March 4, 2020

Understand partial-stroke testing

Partial-stroke tests (PSTs) of emergency shutdown (ESD) valves improve safety instrumented system (SIS) performance; monitor these critical valves to ensure the system’s ability to shut a process down in the event of an emergency

By Sunil Doddi
Courtesy: Mark T. Hoske, CFE Media and Technology
Sensors, Actuators March 3, 2020

How to select, apply process sensors

When specifying process sensors, several common factors need to be considered such as the operating environment, mounting options and cable connections.

By Daniel E. Capano
Courtesy: Mark T. Hoske, CFE Media and Technology
Process Manufacturing February 24, 2020

Top 5 Control Engineering articles February 17-23

Articles about the Engineers' Choice winners, process valve choices, cotton gin improvements, robots and drones in process facilities, and the top 2019 university articles were Control Engineering’s five most clicked articles from February 17-23. Miss something? You can catch up here.

By Chris Vavra
For years, researchers from MIT and Brown University have been developing an interactive system that lets users drag-and-drop and manipulate data on any touchscreen, including smartphones and interactive whiteboards. Now, they’ve included a tool that instantly and automatically generates machine-learning models to run prediction tasks on that data. Courtesy: Melanie Gonick, MIT
Analytics February 13, 2020

Most-viewed university articles in 2019

The most-viewed articles from university sources included stories on drag-and-drop analytics, robotic actuators, nanocrystals, and prolonging power plant life with AI. Links to each article below.

By Chris Vavra
In interface level measurement applications, the Rosemount 5300 Guided Wave Radar Level Transmitter from Emerson enables the minimum detectable thickness of the upper liquid layer to be reduced to 25 mm to optimize separation process efficiency. It received 2020 Engineers’ Choice recognition in the Process control – process sensors, transmitters category. Courtesy: Emerson
Sensors, Actuators February 11, 2020

Advanced radar technology optimizes separation process performance

Level measurement design: Guided wave radar (GWR) transmitters can detect a thinner top liquid layer in interface level measurement applications, making the separation process more efficient and preventing unwanted cross-contamination.

By Christoffer Widahl
Figure 2: Horizontal oil-gas-water separator. Courtesy: Endress & Hauser
Oil and Gas February 3, 2020

Detecting water carryover in natural gas

Instrumentation improves control of the water removal process from natural gas

By Adam Booth
Figure 1: By integrating data into the cloud, an environment is created for cross-sectional analysis, with third-party consultants able to perform high-precision analysis and provide suggestions for optimizing production. Courtesy: Yokogawa Electric Corp.
Virtualization, Cloud Analytics January 31, 2020

Intelligent use of cloud sharpens operational insight

Cloud-based wireless sensing enables safety, reliability and profits through widespread asset monitoring

By Simon Rogers
Courtesy: Mark T. Hoske, CFE Media and Technology
Sensors, Actuators January 29, 2020

Making process control valve choices

Today’s process control valves offer an ever wider range of features and benefits for industries that require precise control over fluids, steam and other gases. With so many control valves to choose from it is important to establish the features that will deliver the most cost-effective design for a particular application.

By Damien Moran
Sensors, Vision January 15, 2020

Machine learning shapes microwaves for a computer’s eyes

Researchers have developed a method to identify objects using microwaves that improves accuracy while reducing the associated computing time and power requirements.

By Ken Kingery